Understanding chinas unpopular one child policy

Some History China has the longest continuous national history something like years and was politically, militarily and economically dominant in its region and also globally significant for most of that period. This seems to have been based on views about the nature of knowledge, society, power, economic goals and governance that are quite different to those of Western societies see East Asia: In overly-simplistic terms China was apparently held together through cultural conformity backed by force [ 1 ]. InChina emerged from its feudal order - and then experienced decades of instability.

Understanding chinas unpopular one child policy

What is even less publicised is how in the drug trade creates a country — Columbia, Mexico, even Afghanistan, certainly the United States, etc. Therefore, aside from birthing modern fortunes, drugs also birthed modern ideologies.

In a sense this article is a bit of a digression in this 8-part series, but it is in many ways the most practical: If this sounds undesirable…then you are in agreement with the constantly-rebelling Chinese of this era. Drugs were the grease which powered this society-undoing machine. China was not so lucky.

The Asahi Shimbun

This drug-fuelled incompetence occurred in China a century ago, and it produced the ideological forerunner of neoliberalism; this drug-fuelled incompetence occurs in many nations today, and it produces modern neoliberalism.

A simple Western recipe for nation-destroying Drugs are not good, and we all know this. The ability of Westerners to get nearly million Chinese people — 1 out of every 4 — on opium in the 19th century was…not good. I take that estimate from the incomparably valuable new tome on Chinese history, China is Communist, Dammit!

Understatements aside, is there any product which is more superbly capitalist than drugs? But it is no overstatement to say that it is profoundly shocking to list the macro-level, societally-destabilising consequences drugs had in 19th century China, and which occurred in just a single generation: Drug money increased the resources and thus the success of foreign warlords foreign imperialists.

Because drugs are so much more profitable than anything else, the drug trade also created the resources to pay for establishing overly-powerful regional Chinese leaders warlordswho reduced the power of the central government.

These warlords, to protect the power they took from the central authority, created their own armies and the professionalized the military class, elevating it as never before in Chinese history.

Opium is still trade, even if it is opium, and it necessarily requires mid-level merchants: Merchants and soldiers composed the bottom two rungs on their classical Confucian hierarchy and soldiers are not even officially granted the status of the bottom rung. This is the opposite of Western society, and we see how Westerners upended Chinese culture upon their very first contact.

Drugs exacerbated the pernicious rural-urban divide: This may have been the deepest socio-economic effect.

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Drugs provide cheap spirituality, and dangerous religious cults sprouted up. Christianity was introduced, but for every 1 Chinese person converted 40 more became addicted to opium not just consumers. Hardly a moral proselytisation to an Abrahamic faith….

Dude, you broke the future! - Charlie's Diary

The foreign-provoked drug trade essentially rewarded the central power with money for not governing ignoring laws against drugs, ignoring the decreasing health, stability and quality of life of their citizens, etc.

For example, when the central government tried in to fix the tax system it was quickly abandoned.Abstract: We're living in yesterday's future, and it's nothing like the speculations of our authors and film/TV r-bridal.com a working science fiction novelist, I take a professional interest in how we get predictions about the future wrong, and why, so that I can avoid repeating the same mistakes.

James Howard Kunstler is the author of many books including (non-fiction) The Geography of Nowhere, The City in Mind: Notes on the Urban Condition, Home from Nowhere, The Long Emergency, and Too Much Magic: Wishful Thinking, Technology and the Fate of the Nation.

The following estimates represent citizens killed or starved to death by their own Communist governments since These numbers do not include war dead. James Howard Kunstler is the author of many books including (non-fiction) The Geography of Nowhere, The City in Mind: Notes on the Urban Condition, Home from Nowhere, The Long Emergency, and Too Much Magic: Wishful Thinking, Technology and the Fate of the Nation.

Understanding chinas unpopular one child policy

Download-Theses Mercredi 10 juin This male excess is from the recently rescinded “one child only” policy which then resulted in FEMALE infanticide as male children are preferred.

World Wrassling Diplomacy - Kunstler